Staying overnight

Things have been going well on the farm. Nisse and Armando finished the fence they started on the 27th, now the turkeys stay behind the house for the most part. The small turkeys and chickens are able to make it through a hole in the kitchen wall and come in, but there’s not much you can do about that.

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Nick and I spent the night last night, and it was a good night to go. We watched as a rain storm slowly took over the nearest town, covering it in a wavy, gray blanket of rain until the storm reached the farm. Soon, all you could hear was thunder. The lights inside the home flickered on and off until the storm overpowered the electricity and the lights went out.

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The opportunity to document this story is giving me personal stories I will never forget. Last night when we all sat down to dinner on the farm. Nick was digging into his second plate, out of nowhere a chicken jumped up and sat down on his plate. Nick moved his plate around in the air, but the chicken wouldn’t budge. Eventually, Nisse and Armando grabbed the chicken and got him off. Nick dumped the rest of his food on the floor and the chickens cleaned it all up. It was absolutely hilarious and was a moment where all four of us could share in a deep laugh together.
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Time is winding down in Brazil. I’m going to be sad to leave Nisse and Armando and all their animals, but i’ll be making the most of the time we have left.

Feliz ano novo!

-Matt

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From above

Last night I had the opportunity to take photographs from atop one of the many skyscrapers on Paulista Avenue, thanks to Andrew Dickinson, who needed roof access for his motoboy story.

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Being high above the streets was the first chance I had to truly grasp how huge this city is. It doesn’t matter which direction you look toward, there are too many skyscrapers to count.

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There was a light rain while Andrew and I were up on the building, so I figured finding some sort of rain feature photo was necessary. I messed around with probably a dozen different shots before taking this frame. It’s rare to go a day in Sao Paulo without rain, and when it didn’t rain for nearly two days this week, we all started to miss the rain.

Thanks for looking,

Matt

Rainy city

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Yesterday, while the blizzard was raging in Nebraska, it was pouring rain in São Paulo.

Downpours were so bad that 29 people died in floods and mudslides in the Rio de Janeiro metro area. The rain was coming down in São Paulo, too, but not to the extent that it was up the road in the Carnival capital of Brazil.

So, naturally, I headed out to shoot. There was no translator available, but Brian came along and we took the metro downtown.

My story while in São Paulo is on motoboys. These men (and, sometimes, women. I’m working on finding a female rider) are essentially couriers who zip in and out of traffic carrying documents or packages to their destination. The short explanation of the story is that they are paid little for a very high risk job.

According to a few news reports, one motoboy dies per day in São Paulo. There are thousands of them here, and they are necessary to the way business has adapted to incredibly congested traffic in this huge city. If you want to get a document or package across town in a reasonable amount of time, you need a motoboy.

As one contact told me at dinner two nights ago, no business can survive without a motoboy.

So I tried to make some pictures of them in the rain, and made some pictures of pedestrians as they dealt with the rain, too. Without a translator I was unable to talk with anyone (not that they wanted to stop and stand and chat in the pouring rain, anyways), but here’s what I came away with.

My pants are still hanging out the window drying.

As always, thanks for looking.

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